Changes between Version 41 and Version 42 of tutorial


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Timestamp:
07/25/08 10:52:31 (9 years ago)
Author:
lexheerink
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  • tutorial

    v41 v42  
    108108'''Motivation''' Models are often hierarchically structured. Consider for example package hierarchy in UML, composite states in Statecharts or hierarchical !PetriNets. Such hierarchical structuring usually is intended to make the models easier to understand. However, to analyze such models it may be necessary to flatten the model to a model without hierarchy. 
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    110 '''Flattening''' The following transformation outlines how to flatten a composite source model to a target model. It is assumed that the source model and target model are specified by the same metamodel. The idea of the mapping is as follows. All ''Composites'' in the source model are related to the ''!RootElement'' in the target model. The ''!CompositeContext'' is either the ''!RootElement'' or another ''Composite''. Thus the ''!CompositeContext c1'' should be related to the ''!RootElement r'' via ''!RootMapping'' or ''!CompositeFlattening ''itself. All model elements are mapped from the source model to the target model using instances of the ''!CompositeFlattening'' transformation. 
     110'''Flattening''' The following transformation outlines how to flatten a composite source model to a target model. It is assumed that the source model and target model are specified by the same metamodel. The idea of the mapping is as follows. All `Composites` in the source model are related to the `RootElement` in the target model. The `CompositeContext `is either the `RootElement `or another `Composite`. Thus the `CompositeContext c1 `should be related to the `RootElement r` via `RootMapping` or `CompositeFlattening`'' ''itself. All model elements are mapped from the source model to the target model using instances of the `CompositeFlattening` transformation. 
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    141141'''Motivation''' Hierarchy refinement is typically used to zoom in to the structure of a super node thereby revealing the internal structure of a sub node. In behaviour models, hierarchy refinement can be used to zoom in to sub behaviours of a node. 
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    143 '''Hierarchy transformation pattern''' The hierarchy transformation pattern is characterized by a single mapping rule that takes a node in the source domain and maps it a hierarchical structure (called b_sub in the pattern below) that may contain sub nodes (called sub_node in the pattern below). The specification of the hierarchy refinement pattern is shown below. 
     143'''Hierarchy transformation pattern''' The hierarchy transformation pattern is characterized by a single mapping rule that takes a node in the source domain and maps it a hierarchical structure (called`b_sub `in the pattern below) that may contain sub nodes (called`sub_node `in the pattern below). The specification of the hierarchy refinement pattern is shown below. 
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    145145{{{